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Research from numerous studies have found trafficking rates among youth and young adults experiencing homelessness ranging from 19% to 40%. Although the varying populations and methods of these studies do not allow for a definitive number, this means, using the lower end estimates, that about 800,000 of the youth and young adults who experience homelessness in a year may also be victims of sex or labor trafficking in cities, suburbs, rural communities, and American Indian Reservations across the country. The pathways from homelessness to trafficking can and should be disrupted with policy and practice changes, including cross-sector collaboration, as well as increased resources. Many of the recommendations below—and in the full white paper—focus on providing services and supports to address youth homelessness and to meet youth and family needs. That is because, as the above discussion illustrates, homelessness prevention and services are trafficking prevention. Research from numerous studies have found trafficking rates among youth and young adults experiencing homelessness ranging from 19% to 40%. Although the varying populations and methods of these studies do not allow for a definitive number, this means, using the lower end estimates, that about 800,000 of the youth and young adults who experience homelessness in a year may also be victims of sex or labor trafficking in cities, suburbs, rural communities, and American Indian Reservations across the country.